Scott Stringer

Democratic Mayoral Candidate

Stringer has spent his entire career in New York politics including 12 year in the State Assembly representing the Upper West Side, 8 years as Manhattan Borough President and now 8 years as NYC Comptroller.

Candidate's Standing On The Issues

Education

  • Stringer supports the elimination of G&T tests for elementary school programs, however believes that specialization programs do not have to be eliminated entirely. He does aim to open the programs to children of all backgrounds but has not articulated a specific plan for this. (Source: Gotham Gazette)
  • Would increase the availability of technical training in city high schools. He also supports making CUNY Community College tuition free and wants to implement a universal paid internship program (unclear how this program will be funded). (Source Stringer for Mayor) (Source: Comptroller.nyc.gov)
  • Wants to remove NYPD presence from schools. (Source: Stringer for Mayor)
  • Stringer, a long-time bike advocate, proposes a “Bike to School” plan that includes building out bike lanes around New York City high schools and providing bikes or Citibike membership to lower-income students. (Source: NY Daily News)
  • Wants to increase support for families with children before they reach Pre-K. This includes increasing child care assistance to working families with children under the age of 3 and investing $500 million in upgrading childcare facilities across the city. (Source: Stringer for Mayor)
  • Supports vouchers for internet access to be provided to all low income students to ensure equal access to the internet for all students. (Source: Gotham Gazette)

Mental Health

  • Wants increased mental health services in schools. ((Source: Stringer for Mayor)
  • Criticized the poor management of DeBlasio’s $1B Thrive program (Source: Daily News)

Public Safety

  • Called to Defund the NYPD at BLM rally over the summer but has since walked back his stance to say he wants to reduce its funding by $1Billion. At the same time he has listed several roles that he no longer wants the NYPD to be involved in such as calls related to mental health, homelessness, and drug use. (Source: New York Times, Stringer for Mayor)
  • Will not reconstitute the recently disbanded Anti-Crime Unit. (Source: Daily News) Known colloquially as the plain clothed police, this unit was composed of undercover police who were assigned to each district and all city housing projects. The Anti-Crime Unit was largely responsible for getting illegal guns off the streets and disrupting local crime sprees such as burglaries.
  • Wants to create a first response service separate from the NYPD to respond to non-crime related calls. Does not believe NYPD should be part of the response to mental health calls. (Source: Stringer For Mayor)
  • Has signaled an interest in decriminalizing drug use and supports the creation of “safe use sites” where drug addicts can use drugs under supervision of healthcare workers and peers for their safety (i.e., to make sure they don’t overdose). (Source: Queens Eagle) Note: All the major mayoral candidates with the exception of McGuire support such sites and say they would place them in neighborhoods even over Community Board objections, except for Garcia, who says she would defer to local communities.
  • Stringer was the first mayor to call for the closure of Rikers Island jail complex but has also opposed the alternative of building borough based jails because he says they are too big. It is therefore unclear where he believes criminals should be housed. (Source: Gotham Gazette)
  • He does believe that violent criminals must be held in jails though. ‘In a utopian world, it would be great to say no new jails, but we do need to keep the very dangerous off the streets.’ (Source: VocalNYC)
  • Would take mentally ill individuals from jails and move them into supportive housing. (Source: VocalNYC)

Housing & Homelessness

  • Stringer would prioritize wealthy neighborhoods as places to add shelters and additional affordable housing as a means to increasing diversity within each neighborhood. As such he would mandate Universal Affordable Housing that would require every developer to set aside 25% of any new residential units for low-income housing. (Source: Stringer for Mayor)
  • Would also build permanent housing or very low income housing for homeless individuals on city owned land. (Source: Stringer for Mayor)
  • Wants to convert vacant hotels into commercial spaces and shelters to provide affordable housing. (Source: Stringer for Mayor)
  • Increase the stock of Safe Haven style shelters which, unlike standard shelters, do not have sobriety or curfew requirements. (Source: Stringer for Mayor)
  • Proposes to divert more than $400 million in excess revenue from the Battery Park City Authority (BPCA) to the cash-strapped New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) (Source: The Broadsheet). In general, Stringer has been a long-time advocate of increasing resources to adequately maintain NYCHA housing.
  • Mr. Stringer attributes homeless crisis to a housing issue and has committed to creating 40k low-income housing units and more, higher-valued vouchers to cover the cost of rent. (Source: VocalNYC)

Small Businesses

  • Stringer would streamline bureaucratic challenges for small businesses by creating a centralized digital portal where they can process all paperwork. (Source: Stringer for NYC)
  • Stringer released a “Save Mainstreet” platform aimed at helping struggling small businesses. He proses immediate tax relief to help them with mounting bills and would prioritize door-to-door outreach to very small businesses to ensure they know how to access all forms of aid, both local and federal, that are available. (Source: Stringer for Mayor)
  • Supports amending laws so businesses have 30 days to “cure” violations and thereby avoid a fine. (Source: Stringer for Mayor)
  • Create a city-based resource to help small businesses with their technology needs, including their online presence. (Source: Stringer for Mayor)

Fiscal Outlook

  • Supports the legalization of drugs such as marijuana because it allows city to collect the income. (Source: VocalNYC)

Who is Scott Stringer?

Scott Stringer is running as “Progressive” but is outflanked on the left by candidates such as Maya Wiley and Dianne Morales.

Scott Stringer is a life-long New Yorker who has been part of the Democratic political establishment for his entire career, first representing the Upper West Side in Albany and then moving to Manhattan Borough President. Most recently he has served as the Comptroller of the City.  As both Borough President and Comptroller, Stringer wrote many reports about various agencies and policies of the City but he is not known for any particularly noteworthy policies that have been rolled out.

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