Liz Crotty

Democratic Candidate for Manhattan District Attorney

Liz Crotty says “Justice must work for all.”

Hate Crimes: “These horrific stories are becoming far too frequent. These victims need justice, and we need to ensure that future offenders will think twice before acting violently.” (Source: Twitter)

“Legalizing cannabis is exactly the kind of smart solution we need to achieve equal justice.” (Source: Twitter)

“The safety of our neighborhoods and our workforce must be a paramount goal” (Source: CityLimits.org)

“I really saw a lack of a voice for the everyday, ordinary New Yorker who wants to ride the train and feel safe.” (Source: Jewish Insider)

Qualifications/ Experience

Prosecutorial Experience

  • Partner at Crotty & Saland PC (Criminal Defense Law Practice)
  • Former Assistant District Attorney in the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, with experience in both the Trial Division (cases included street crimes, attempted murder, assault, burglary and robbery) and the Investigation Division (cases included complex white-collar crimes on the local, national and international level).

Managerial Experience

  • Founding member of Crotty & Saland PC and government experience noted above.

Top Priorities as DA

  • Reinstitute the NYPD Anti-Crime Unit. Crotty feels re-establishing these units at the Precinct level, is the best way to get guns off the streets and to prevent shootings and homicides. (Source: InformNYC Candidate Forum)
  • Target corporate corruption. Crotty wants to prioritize the investigatory capabilities of the DA’s office to uncover the far-reaching and detrimental effects of white-collar crime on hardworking New Yorkers. (Source: LizCrotty2021.com)
  • Address sex crimes and domestic violence. Victims of sex crime and domestic violence suffer at the hands of their assailants in ways that “persist psychologically well beyond the instances of the crimes committed against them.” This district attorney’s office must offer the full support and resources victims need and deserve. Crotty has proposed the establishment of a Sex Crimes and Domestic Violence Bureau which will centralize the handling of these cases. (Source: Gotham Gazette)
  • Address hate crimes. Crotty plans to establish outreach programs to encourage communities to report these crimes and to employ restorative justice programs to encourage hate crime offenders to face their biases head-on with hand-picked expert facilitators. (Source: LizCrotty2021.com)
Candidate's Standing On The Issues

Prosecution of Crime

  • “Our Criminal Justice system must change so that victims can get justice, so that defendants can get fair shots, and so that everyone gets to feel safe. Criminal Justice reform must make sense and benefit all New Yorkers, whether you are a defendant or whether you are a victim, family member, witness, or police officer.”
  • “Blanket policies about crimes the DA will not prosecute is a bit of an abuse of that discretion and that’s why we elect legislators and not DAs to decide those things.”
  • “Understanding that incarceration is not always the best and only solution to the problem, I will enhance restorative justice programs and make them more accessible as go-to resolutions in some cases.”
  • Crotty challenged the premise of the question in a recent candidate forum, declining to say what crimes she wouldn’t prosecute. “We’re not legislators. We’re DAs, and the job is to enforce the laws of the State of New York,” said Crotty, a criminal defense attorney who worked in the office of Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau. “I see as a constituent, as a New Yorker, the argument for not prosecuting certain cases, but that’s actually not the job.”

Public Safety

  • “The core principle of the DA’s office is to ensure justice and to pursue policies that protect our citizens and businesses. This concept doesn’t have to oppose criminal-justice reform. Many of those running for DA have focused exclusively on reform. We need to breathe with both lungs: reform and safety.”
  • “A lot of people in this race are speaking to a national, progressive platform, and not a localized, ‘what is going on here in Manhattan’ platform. All politics are local, and I think they should speak to the problems that we’re seeing in New York — especially, since COVID, crime has risen, and I think we have to really speak to it. Being honest about what we’re seeing and what’s going on is more important than a political point of view.”
  • “I will make witness safety a priority in any case prosecuted in the Office of the District Attorney. Victims and our community should be protected from violence.”
  • “When instances of domestic violence, gun violence, hate crimes, or sex crimes occur, the last predicament residents want is having to call an underfunded and unequipped police force.”
  • “I will institute programs to assist these re-entering offenders find jobs and receive counseling and support, so that they get the opportunity to contribute to society in a meaningful way.”

On Guns

  • “I think we have to make sure people understand if they have guns in New York, that they are going to be fully prosecuted. Safety has to come first, and I think that if you have a gun, you should think that you are going to jail because deterrence is a natural thing when it comes to gun crimes.”
  • “Prosecuting these cases and asking for bail should be fully within the realm of what the district attorney should do.”

On Recidivism

  • “I think with quality-of-life crimes, there does have to be some pushback to say, listen, we’re willing to give you the benefit of the doubt once or twice, but you know, third, fourth time you have to be held accountable.”
  • “Bail reform must also have some mechanism for recidivists and those people arrested while they have open cases.”

On the role of NYPD

  • “Police need to be trained longer and better and paid more, and I think that that’s what we need to be working on,” she added. “They are a stakeholder in the criminal justice system because they make arrests and then we decide what — or not — to prosecute from there. But it starts with an arrest. So I’m not willing to give up on the idea that police can do better.”
  • “There have been problems with over policing, but there’s an even bigger problem with under policing, which is exactly what you’re talking about. I think we do have to hold police accountable, but we also have to hold defendants accountable, and accountability is where we really get fairness.”

Mental Illness & Crime

  • “Mental health treatment court is a big thing. There’s really only a mental health treatment court right now for felonies; there needs to be a mental health treatment court for misdemeanors, where you can really tie the people who’ve committed crimes to getting the services that they really need.”
February 3, 2021

Lunch with Liz Crotty, Candidate for Manhattan DA.

February 9, 2021

InformNYC Evening Forum with Liz Crotty

October 21, 2020

Two Essential Reforms to the Manhattan DA’s Office to Better Protect Victims

December 15, 2020

Op-Ed: Healing between Police and Communities Starts with Intelligent Reform

January 26, 2021

Opinion: NYC Subways Urgently Need More Cops

January 27, 2021

Manhattan DA candidate wants more cops on subways to combat crime spike

February 2, 2021

NYC won’t return to its former glory without law and order

February 3, 2021

NYPD won’t stop subway crime if cops only parade on mezzanines

April 12, 2021

Liz Crotty takes the middle path to Manhattan DA

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